Posted by: the warrioress | July 9, 2013

Unconditional Love Brings Death

Absolutely love this posting by Rebecca Trotter. She has obviously heard God’s voice within her spirit and is teaching His word. The challenge is whether or not God’s people will hear it. Thanks for the insight and truth, Rebecca!

The Upside Down World

Unconditional-LoveI’ve come across a number of Christians lately who are questioning the impulse to elevate love above any other concern. Love is too soft and squishy, they say. Love becomes an excuse to avoid hard things like confronting sin and enforcing discipline. One writer even asked if we are in danger of making love an idol. (Perhaps he hasn’t gotten to the part where the bible says that God IS love?!?) 

I have something to tell you about people who say that love is squishy, soft, a cop-out: quite clearly, such a person has never actually attempted to love unconditionally. Loving unconditionally is the hardest thing any human being can ever try to do. Confronting sin? Upsetting friends and family? Setting boundaries and rules? Pffftttt . . . . Those are the simplest, most natural things in the world for the fallen human mind to do. Loving unconditionally? That WILL…

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Responses

  1. Great post Adrienne Thank you so much for sharing it. I reblogged it also. Simply awesome truth! Blessings to you Sister, hope you are well xx

  2. Great post. And so very true. Love is only squishy when it’s not really love. Love rejoices with the truth. And it sacrifices for all. That kind of dichotomy can only be achieved by a spirit other than what comes from humans. God is love. But our human concept of love is not God.

  3. I was taught, as I was growing up, that every journey begins with the first step. Unconditional love means giving without expecting something in return. We humans think that everything we do should have some sort of return. Jesus loves unconditionally, He asks only that we love Him back. He doesn’t expect us to, but if we do He blesses us with more love.

    I have found over the years that I can do that also. Love unconditionally – it was hard at first, because I was expecting results, but as I grew I learned that results were not what I should be looking for. It was the satisfaction of loving another without prejudice and not expecting anything in return. It all became easier when I realized that. That is what life is all about!
    God is love and as a child of God I am love. As brothers and sisters through God we are love. I love unconditionally and am blessed for it. Live your life all day everyday in peaceful love.

    Ed

  4. Even those who think love is “squishy ” deserve unconditional love. As Christians, those who have accepted the gift of forgiveness, are also to be salt and light. It’s a balancing act, governed by the Holy Spirit, customized for each individual encounter. Thanks!

  5. Thank you for reblogging this excellent article!

    Have a blessed day! 🙂
    \o/
    Praising Jesus!

  6. This is another fine cartoon by David Hayward — he is a “progressive Christian” ex-pastor from a conservative charismatic Christian tradition. I think his stuff counterbalances your WARRIOR stuff very nicely. You might want to follow his cartoons regularly! I highly recommend him — oooops, that probably kills his credibility, doesn’t it? 🙂

  7. Interestingly I commented on Rebecca Trotter’s post but it was not published.

  8. Sabio, that’s odd. She must have missed your comment somehow.

  9. Sabio, I will look into these “fine cartoons” from Mr. Hayward. I will get back to you on my opinion as soon as time allows me to do this. Thanks for recommending him. 😉

  10. Thanks, Lessonsbyheart!

  11. Brenda, I agree that it’s a balancing act. Thanks for your comment!

  12. Ed, I love the way you put that. I’ve been learning this, though I cannot say I love unconditionally consistently. I try to love this way but often find it challenging. There are circumstances where loving this way is beneficial for all and others where I don’t understand how I can love this way under certain circumstances, but I’m learning. The not expecting anything in return is a challenge, and I find I am a real newbie when it comes to this aspect of loving.

    God bless, Ed,

    (hugs)

    Adrienne

  13. Thanks Ask me! I agree with you.

  14. Thanks, Water Bearer! I’m doing pretty good & hope you are well also.

  15. Had an interesting discussion on my site under the reblog of this post. Would love to hear your perspective. Xx

  16. Water Bearer said:

    Had an interesting discussion on my site under the reblog of this post. Would love to hear your perspective. Xx

    I’m going to have to reread her blog to comment appropriately. It’s so difficult to be in that “love everyone” mindset right now with Trayvon Martin having been murdered and the perpetrator going scott free. I don’t feel very loving right now, you know? It will probably do me good to reread Rebecca’s posting and participate in your discussion. Give me a little and I’ll hop in. Thanks, WB.

  17. You have a choice and the decision you make is what you live with. You can forgive and love, as the Father does for us every minute of everyday or you can ask yourself why. Then ask God why he forgives you for everything and you can’t forgive someone for a tiny mistake.
    We make it hard, God doesn’t.

    ♥♥ Ed

  18. Ed,

    I do forgive Zimmerman for murdering an unarmed teenage child. And I love him as a human being who errs, who is sinful, and perhaps may not even know the Lord. Unfortunately, Zimmerman stole a child’s life; that is not a tiny thing in my opinion. I don’t believe Z. should not have to suffer consequences legally for this murder. On the other hand, I do firmly believe that Z will indeed suffer having to stay in hiding for the remainder of his life.

    Right now though, I believe Mr. Z. should be serving time in prison for manslaughter, regardless of what the jury said. They are mistaken in their judgment. I have to accept their verdict, yes, but I can join the fight against their erroneous decision so that something like this never happens to another child again. — that is what I’m focused upon at the moment because it really matters to me.

  19. Having years of work in Emergency Departments and Trauma Surgery, I have had many people die in front of me. I also have had the misfortune to have defend my life from deadly attacks several times in my life. In light of those experiences, I want to add a few gentle corrections to this issue:

    (1) Being 17 does not make someone a “child”. Children kill. Once someone can potentially kill by intent, I do not classify them as “children”. Using the term is prejudicing the issue.

    (2) You don’t need a weapon to kill. Bare hands can do it just fine.

    That’s all.

  20. Ooops, I forgot to add to the above. Of those people that have died in my care, many were killed by “children” and several killed without formal weapons. When I worked in a lock down institution for children (12-17yo) I had a 16 year-old “child” hold a florescent bulb to my throat during a riot.
    Just sayin’

  21. I realize this, Sabio, and Ed, but the point is that Trayvon was simply minding his own business. He was coming back from the store with his candy and drink to watch basketball. Because he is racially profiled by Z. he is followed and confronted by a stranger whom he has no idea is a watchman in the neighborhood. How do we blame him for being afraid and deciding he better go on defend himself alert?

    His friend, who testified in court about it said that he was afraid, that she had told him the guy (Zimmerman) might be a rapist. Seriously, Sabio, would you blame your own son for the same action if someone was following him and didn’t announce his neighborhood watchman status? Wouldn’t you tell your son to run or try to protect himself? Why did Z keep this information to himself? It’s pretty odd.

    This crime was just pure dee manslaughter, without a doubt.

  22. Hey Adrienna:

    In China (I worked for the US Consulate in Western China as their medical officer), one night while walking the streets with my girlfriend, I noticed a Chinese guy sneakily following us through the city and even in a deserted ally. My GF thought I was paranoid — but I am pretty observant. So I confronted him and I didn’t speak the language (dialect) well. The man walked at me quickly speaking Chinese. I felt threatened and in danger so (being martially trained) I kicked him down to the ground. I then told him to leave us alone or the next kick would be far worse. He walked away.

    The next day, I was called into the Consulate General’s Office (he had become a friend by then — he loved my patient manners with his Cambodian wife). The Consulate General told me he heard from Chinese officials that I had beat-up my “tag”. I was then informed that every official working in the consulate has a “tag” that follows them all the time — news to me. They should have warned me.

    If my tag had been Zimmerman, and armed, I may have been killed.

    So, I will let you draw your conclusions from this. Who would have been guilty then?


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